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PsychContinuingEd.com is an Ohio registered trade name of Dr. Todd Finnerty, Psy.D. Contact Dr. Finnerty with any questions via toddfinnerty@toddfinnerty.com or (330)495-8809.

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Journal Articles Course: HP1 Health Psychology Articles #1 (2 CE, $15)

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This is a course based on reading peer-reviewed journal articles.

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Read three journal articles and receive two CE credits for just $16. The full text of the journal articles can be obtained via the links below (currently all three can be obtained for free online). The articles have been field tested and it should take approximately two hours total to read all 3 articles.

The articles are titled:
Effective techniques in healthy eating and physical activity interventions: A meta-regression

Health beliefs before and after participation on an exercised-based rehabilitation programme for chronic knee pain: Doing is believing

The effectiveness of interventions to change six health behaviours: a review of reviews

Jennifer & Todd Finnerty, Psy.D. are the instructors for the course. Contact Dr. Finnerty with any questions via toddfinnerty@toddfinnerty.com or (330)495-8809. There are no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Course objective #1: Participants will be able to describe effective components of interventions designed to increase physical activity and healthy eating.

Course Objective #2: Participants will be able to describe a program pertaining to exercise and pain.

Course Objective #3: Participants will be able to list interventions which are effective in achieving behavior change.

The articles can be obtained here:

Effective techniques in healthy eating and physical activity interventions: A meta-regression

Full text From APA (for a fee)
Full text PDF file online(currently free)
Authors: Michie, Susan; Abraham, Charles; Whittington, Craig; McAteer, John; Gupta, Sunjai
Abstract: "Objective: Meta-analyses of behavior change (BC) interventions typically find large heterogeneity in effectiveness and small effects. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of active BC interventions designed to promote physical activity and healthy eating and investigate whether theoretically specified BC techniques improve outcome. Design: Interventions, evaluated in experimental or quasi-experimental studies, using behavioral and/or cognitive techniques to increase physical activity and healthy eating in adults, were systematically reviewed. Intervention content was reliably classified into 26 BC techniques and the effects of individual techniques, and of a theoretically derived combination of self-regulation techniques, were assessed using meta-regression. Main Outcome Measures: Valid outcomes of physical activity and healthy eating. Results: The 122 evaluations (N = 44,747) produced an overall pooled effect size of 0.31 (95% confidence interval = 0.26 to 0.36, I2 = 69%). The technique, “self-monitoring,” explained the greatest amount of among-study heterogeneity (13%). Interventions that combined self-monitoring with at least one other technique derived from control theory were significantly more effective than the other interventions (0.42 vs. 0.26). Conclusion: Classifying interventions according to component techniques and theoretically derived technique combinations and conducting meta-regression enabled identification of effective components of interventions designed to increase physical activity and healthy eating."
Health Psychology, Vol 28(6), Nov 2009, 690-701

Health beliefs before and after participation on an exercised-based rehabilitation programme for chronic knee pain: Doing is believing

Full text on the web (free)
Full text PDF file (free)
Authors: Michael V Hurley, Nicola Walsh, Vanita Bhavnani, Nicky Britten, and Fiona Stevenson.
Abstract: "Background:
To explore the health beliefs, experiences, treatment and expectations of people with chronic knee pain, and investigate if, how and why these change after taking part on an integrated exercise-based rehabilitation programme - Enabling Self-management and Coping with Arthritis knee Pain through Exercise, ESCAPE-knee pain.
Methods
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with people with chronic knee pain, before (n = 29) and after (n = 23) participation on the programme. Thematic analysis was used to document people's baseline health beliefs, attitudes and cognitions, and to see if how and why these changed after completing the programme.
Results
Initially people had poor understanding and negative, fatalistic beliefs about the management or prognosis for knee pain. Following the programme the majority of participants had positive experiences describing improvement in pain, physical and psychosocial functioning, greater knowledge and understanding of their condition and treatment options, and in their ability to use exercise to control symptoms. Beliefs about the causation and prognosis of knee pain were unchanged, but their concerns about possible dangers of exercise had decreased, they appreciated how exercise could reduce symptoms (treatment beliefs) and their confidence in their ability to use exercise to effect improvements (exercise self-efficacy) increased. These improvements were attributed to the content and structure of the programme, and the care and guidance of the physiotherapist. Several expressed a need for on-going support.
Conclusions
ESCAPE-knee pain appears to achieve improvements by increasing people's treatment belief in safety and the utility of exercise to control symptoms, rather than alteration in their beliefs about causation or prognosis."
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders. 2010; 11: 31.

The effectiveness of interventions to change six health behaviours: a review of reviews

Full text on the web (free)
Full text PDF file (free)
Authors: Ruth G Jepson, Fiona M Harris, Stephen Platt, and Carol Tannahill
Abstract: "Background
Several World Health Organisation reports over recent years have highlighted the high incidence of chronic diseases such as diabetes, coronary heart disease and cancer. Contributory factors include unhealthy diets, alcohol and tobacco use and sedentary lifestyles. This paper reports the findings of a review of reviews of behavioural change interventions to reduce unhealthy behaviours or promote healthy behaviours. We included six different health-related behaviours in the review: healthy eating, physical exercise, smoking, alcohol misuse, sexual risk taking (in young people) and illicit drug use. We excluded reviews which focussed on pharmacological treatments or those which required intensive treatments (e.g. for drug or alcohol dependency).
Methods
The Cochrane Library, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE) and several Ovid databases were searched for systematic reviews of interventions for the six behaviours (updated search 2008). Two reviewers applied the inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed the quality of the reviews. The results were discussed in a narrative synthesis.
Results
We included 103 reviews published between 1995 and 2008. The focus of interventions varied, but those targeting specific individuals were generally designed to change an existing behaviour (e.g. cigarette smoking, alcohol misuse), whilst those aimed at the general population or groups such as school children were designed to promote positive behaviours (e.g. healthy eating). Almost 50% (n = 48) of the reviews focussed on smoking (either prevention or cessation). Interventions that were most effective across a range of health behaviours included physician advice or individual counselling, and workplace- and school-based activities. Mass media campaigns and legislative interventions also showed small to moderate effects in changing health behaviours. Generally, the evidence related to short-term effects rather than sustained/longer-term impact and there was a relative lack of evidence on how best to address inequalities.
Conclusions
Despite limitations of the review of reviews approach, it is encouraging that there are interventions that are effective in achieving behavioural change. Further emphasis in both primary studies and secondary analysis (e.g. systematic reviews) should be placed on assessing the differential effectiveness of interventions across different population subgroups to ensure that health inequalities are addressed."
BMC Public Health. 2010; 10: 538


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